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Selected Poetry

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In the pantheon of English poets, Shelly has long occupied a lofty place, his poems as admired for their profound thought and subtle perceptions as for the music and fervor of their language. His life as well as his poetry embraced the passions, ideals and causes of Romanticism, whose emergence and early influences coincided with the dates of his own brief life (1792-1822) In the pantheon of English poets, Shelly has long occupied a lofty place, his poems as admired for their profound thought and subtle perceptions as for the music and fervor of their language. His life as well as his poetry embraced the passions, ideals and causes of Romanticism, whose emergence and early influences coincided with the dates of his own brief life (1792-1822). This selection of many of his best-known and most representative poems will give readers an exciting encounter with one of the most original and stimulating figures in English poetry.


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In the pantheon of English poets, Shelly has long occupied a lofty place, his poems as admired for their profound thought and subtle perceptions as for the music and fervor of their language. His life as well as his poetry embraced the passions, ideals and causes of Romanticism, whose emergence and early influences coincided with the dates of his own brief life (1792-1822) In the pantheon of English poets, Shelly has long occupied a lofty place, his poems as admired for their profound thought and subtle perceptions as for the music and fervor of their language. His life as well as his poetry embraced the passions, ideals and causes of Romanticism, whose emergence and early influences coincided with the dates of his own brief life (1792-1822). This selection of many of his best-known and most representative poems will give readers an exciting encounter with one of the most original and stimulating figures in English poetry.

30 review for Selected Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Wsm

    An absolute favourite of mine.So musical,so lyrical and so sad.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jonfaith

    It is the same: for, be it joy or sorrow, The path of its departure still is free. Man's yesterday may ne'er be like his morrow; Nought may endure but Mutability! Bought this slim volume for its portability. There were hopes for the transportive. I will leave Elevation to Bono and other (lower-case) bards. My thoughts while digesting this were often rich, if not fecund. Then reality beckoned and I shuddered. Oh Percy Bysse, why did you live so foolishly fully? This secret in the preg It is the same: for, be it joy or sorrow, The path of its departure still is free. Man's yesterday may ne'er be like his morrow; Nought may endure but Mutability! Bought this slim volume for its portability. There were hopes for the transportive. I will leave Elevation to Bono and other (lower-case) bards. My thoughts while digesting this were often rich, if not fecund. Then reality beckoned and I shuddered. Oh Percy Bysse, why did you live so foolishly fully? This secret in the pregnant womb of time, Too vast a matter for so weak a rhyme. I suppose Shelley was an Iggy Pop to Lord Byron's Bowie. Who among us thought Iggy would outlive Ziggy? Loose lips remain the talk of the town. The spies are in open revolt and we parse the stanzas looking for wiretaps.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jawad

    First came across a reference to these beautiful lines of Shelly in Joyce's A portrait of the artist as a young man: To The Moon - 'Art thou pale for weariness Of climbing heaven and gazing on the earth, Wandering companionless Among the stars that have a different birth, And ever changing, like a joyless eye That finds no object worth its constancy?'

  4. 4 out of 5

    侯 二六

    「英國尚在沉睡中:她豈不曾/被喚醒過?」 好啦,現在英國醒了嗎?(以下無關) 所謂抒情,即是熱血又濫情的獨白,從《愛爾蘭人之歌》的慷慨激昂、《世界從誕生到衰亡》「逝者如斯夫」的感歎,乃至《心之靈》的精神出軌……寫散文或詩出賣自己才有看頭。

  5. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    Shelley has way with words! His words, his writing is beautiful, but it becomes very tedious after a while!

  6. 5 out of 5

    USS

    Percy Bysshe Shelley, the English Romantic poet, was not as prolific as his contemporaries, i.e. John Keats and Lord Byron; nevertheless, his output of poesy seemed to have been produced when inspiration hit him the most. Each poem within this volume glows with stunning beauty and the spectrum of the emotions--love, melancholy, happiness, cheerfulness, wistfulness, &c. Many types of poems are in here, including odes, dirges, sonnets, and other forms. Shelley's words were made to read out lou Percy Bysshe Shelley, the English Romantic poet, was not as prolific as his contemporaries, i.e. John Keats and Lord Byron; nevertheless, his output of poesy seemed to have been produced when inspiration hit him the most. Each poem within this volume glows with stunning beauty and the spectrum of the emotions--love, melancholy, happiness, cheerfulness, wistfulness, &c. Many types of poems are in here, including odes, dirges, sonnets, and other forms. Shelley's words were made to read out loud to hear the full music and virtuosic meter of the verse. Excellent work, I must keep it near me for a while!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Hesper

    Well, there's no question Shelley could write, though I found little of it that weathered well. If you can keep a straight face when confronted with rabid, self-indulgent Romanticism, then you will probably love Shelley. Alas, I cannot keep a straight face or love. Ah woe! Alas! pain, pain ever, forever!* #eyeroll *Sorry, Prometheus. I feel for you, just not so much when Shelley makes you say ridiculous things due to flimsy reasons involving THE GLORY OF POETRY.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    I'll probably be reading this one for a while. It's like talking to a really eloquent crazy person.....which is a good thing.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    My least favourite of the Romantics, but I do value him for his use of the lyric.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    All he ever had to write was "The Cloud".

  11. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Jung

    This boy is high drama

  12. 4 out of 5

    Devina

    3.2

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa (Harmonybites)

    I'm not the fan of poetry that some people are. I've been more likely to buy and read anthologies that cherry pick, rather than read entire books by one poet--with a few favorite exceptions such as Shakespeare, Donne, Dickenson--and especially Keats, which I suspect is spoiling me for lesser romantic poets. The book of Keats' poetry I rated a five. Even if I wasn't crazy about his one epic poem, Endymion, I found so much depth in his work. Not simply in the sense of how specific poems hit me, but that al I'm not the fan of poetry that some people are. I've been more likely to buy and read anthologies that cherry pick, rather than read entire books by one poet--with a few favorite exceptions such as Shakespeare, Donne, Dickenson--and especially Keats, which I suspect is spoiling me for lesser romantic poets. The book of Keats' poetry I rated a five. Even if I wasn't crazy about his one epic poem, Endymion, I found so much depth in his work. Not simply in the sense of how specific poems hit me, but that almost every single one, even ones I wasn't familiar with and weren't among the most famous, struck me as a gem. I didn't feel that way about Shelley. The back of this edition says that his work "has been criticized for its didacticism and undisciplined emotion." If by that is meant it's larded with classical allusions and filled with so many flowers and birds I find it at times very girly--well, I can't help but agree. Like Coleridge, who I read just before this, Shelley strikes me as full of poetic cliches. A friend who has read a lot in this period tells me that the Romantics were all about the cliches--but with Keats his treatment of conventions felt fresh. The introduction says of Shelley that "no poet better repays cutting; no great poet was ever less worth reading in his entirety." Harsh perhaps, and although I found him more worthwhile than Coleridge, there were perhaps only a dozen poems here out of the 71 included here I really liked, and few I'd call out as ones I loved: "Ozymandias" (my favorite--I loved the irony, something I found rare in Shelley), "Love's Philosophy," "The Cloud" (with imagery that really seemed fresh to me rather than canned), "Music, When Soft Voices Die" (often anthologized and set to music) and "Autumn: A Dirge." All of them among his shorter, lyric poems. The introduction also says of Shelley that "if one must grade poets, he comes, in the hierarchy of his period, well after Wordsworth and Keats." I haven't read Wordsworth extensively enough to judge if I'd agree--or enough of the other Romantic poets certainly. But I can't help agree about this assessment of Shelley when compared to Keats, which is why this book of Shelley's poems is rated a couple of steps lower than Keats.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Richard Epstein

    I really dislike Shelley -- personally, poetically, ideologically. There's nothing I like about him*, not even his middle name. Of course I feel that way about almost all the "great" Romantics,† Keats being the obvious exception. What an unlikeable group of men, and what a mountain of drivel they produced. *making the usual Ozymandian exception. †I do not object to Coleridge's middle name.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rayne

    I understand why people love you so much, Shelley. I really do. Your way with words is simply outstanding. But... I really, really hate you. Analyzing you is a bitch and you are so egocentric, it is sometimes hard to swallow. Not to mention that you tried to justify your infidelity. So, yeah, there's that. I can't with you. Hopefully, I'll never have to deal with you again.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I'm in love with the poetry, just not the way it's been presented. The selection could have been done a bit better really.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Shelley's internal rhyme ftw

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Dip in & out

  19. 5 out of 5

    James Schwartz

    Shelley is best apprciated in spring...all of his poetry is wonderfully lyrical and interesting.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    staggeringly painful

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Hills

    The Flower That Smiles Today...what a depressing and yet beautiful poem. Yeah, he was on opium when he wrote it, but does that mean I enjoy it any less?

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lorna

  23. 4 out of 5

    Pj

  24. 5 out of 5

    Adrijan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Hayes

  26. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Farrelly

  27. 4 out of 5

    Heather Wiginton

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lucy

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ria

  30. 4 out of 5

    Iluvurmuchness

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